The Jason Effect

I'm Jason Rappaport. I'm showing people how to do anything with Squareknot. I also own and operate Zelda Universe and Zelda Wiki. You should read this blog if you want to. Sometimes there's ice cream.

I'm Jason Rappaport. I write about stuff.

  1. January
    18
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    Nintendo considers 'new business structure' in wake of losses

    Dave Tach, writing for Polygon:

    Sounds like Nintendo’s finally getting it.

    (As an aside, the Wii U has been a complete disaster for me. The 4.0.0U update last year broke Wii Mode on my console, causing me to have to send the console to Nintendo for repair. A month later, I received my Wii U “repaired” - Wii Mode worked, but I couldn’t properly install any of my previous purchases from the Wii Shop Channel.)

  2. October
    31
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    squareknotted:

Happy Halloween from all of us at Squareknot! This is a giant bowl of candy that our CEO Jason brought in today, probably all for himself.

I love Halloween.

    squareknotted:

    Happy Halloween from all of us at Squareknot! This is a giant bowl of candy that our CEO Jason brought in today, probably all for himself.

    I love Halloween.

    via: squareknotted
  3. October
    24
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    squareknotted:

    Check us out! We’re in the latest issue of Philly Mag as one of Philadelphia’s coolest startups. If you’re in our hometown, we hear copies are being delivered everywhere today - so grab a cup of coffee and read up about Squareknot.

    via: squareknotted
  4. October
    7
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    Twilight

    Twilight

  5. September
    28
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    Valve announces the Steam Controller

    One of the primary reasons I don’t use Steam as often as I’d like is because I have to sit down at my computer, straight up, for hours to use a mouse and keyboard. It’s pretty uncomfortable.

    The Wii U, a gaming console, or even my iPhone, is a more comfortable gaming experience in theory. But the Wii U doesn’t have many games worth playing, and most iOS games are small distractions. All the interesting titles, for me, are on PC - the experiences that folks like Valve spend years meticulously crafting.

    Valve’s controller has an interesting design, but it’s pretty upsetting that this is just a concept. Valve has a bad habit of not being like Apple - that is, only announcing products when they are finished and ready to ship - leading them to frequently over-promise and under-deliver. I’m not sure if the Steam Controller and Steam Machines will dominate the living room, it even bring the Steam library to my couch effectively. But, if it does, Valve could generate a powerful presence in the living room.

    Gabe Newell was the first to recognize that Apple was a threat to the living room, well before Nintendo and Microsoft and Sony (who still don’t see that Apple could usurp their positions with AppleTV, especially Nintendo). If anyone’s going to challenge Apple for that position effectively, it’s going to be Valve.

  6. September
    9
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    Sony announces PS Vita TV

    Sony seems to understand something Nintendo does not.

  7. August
    28
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    Nintendo announces 2DS

    I remain convinced that Nintendo determines its next move by throwing darts at a wall.

  8. July
    13
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    Sonic After the Sequel is the best fan game ever made

    Warning: Some serious fan nerdery follows.

    A long time ago - when I was in seventh grade - my friend Emilio Saffi and I, being huge fans of Sonic the Hedgehog, set out to build our own Sonic fan game. Under the alias Xoram, Emilio handled backend, and I handled level design. We never finished our flagship title, but our engines always had really impressive tech demos. Unlike most folks who were building their engines using Multimedia Fusion, we wrote ours from scratch in C. They had real physics and tons of features, like the wacky ability to dynamically change the size of any object on the screen, including Sonic himself. The whole system ran super smooth; smoother than any Sonic engine out there.

    Unfortunately, we got caught in the trap of building and rebuilding our engine to be bigger, better, and more performant. We never finished an entire game.

    It’s always been astounding to me that so many young developers and designers gather around the Sonic franchise. I don’t see this breadth of fan work for any other franchise. No group is as fervent or as dedicated.

    Recently, a fellow under the alias LakeFeperd has done what Emilio and I could never do: build and ship the most impressive fan game ever made. (You should download it now for free.)

    What makes it great? It does something that Sega attempted to do with Sonic Colors, but didn’t get quite right. Taking a page from the Super Mario Galaxy playbook and running with it, Sonic After the Sequel introduces an interesting and fun new platforming mechanic every single act. It’s remarkably successful and breathes new life into the 2D platforming world of classic Sonic.

    However, what’s getting everybody raving is the absolutely outrageous four-disc soundtrack; an OCRemix-quality release full of completely original tunes. LakeFeperd and crew are the first people I’ve seen in a decade that actually understand how to compose music for Sonic games. Their soundtrack rivals the Genesis, and I’d put it on par with the soundtrack for Sonic Colors. I don’t think even the mobile Sonic titles were executed this well, at least as far as their music is concerned.

    I hope Sega is scouting and picks this guy up.

  9. July
    5
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    Single photograph looks like 4 individual photographs

    Outrageously clever composition.

  10. July
    4
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    Seven years

    Every year, the United States of America celebrates a tremendous event by flying explosives across the country skyline. Hundreds of millions of people drop everything to enjoy the spectacle.

    I like to think it’s in honor of my father. This year, more than any other year, I feel the pang of his absence. After his death, I wrote a eulogy to read aloud at his funeral:

    There are things I’ve done in front of him that have made him so proud – things that he bragged about to his office, and that is being strong in the face of a crisis. When he cut his wrist on glass accidentally, and I held his wound shut with a towel. When he broke his ankle, and I didn’t even show any sign of being upset, because I knew he would be alright. Now I have to be strong – not just for me, but for my entire family, and my mother who needs someone to lean on more than ever. I will provide that until they’re calm, and then I can have my turn and lean on them. But they go first.

    Seven years later, I apply this strength to everything I do. But this year, I think I will finally rest and lean on a shoulder or two.

    I love you, Dad.

  11. June
    19
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    Neven Mrgan's critique on the new iOS7 icons

    mrgan:

    The blue, hollow box is the maximum area the icon can fill in this toolbar. If your icon is a “full shape” (one that fills space very efficiently) it would be a mistake to simply make it the size of this bounding box. It would look too big. Instead, it should be inset slightly. That way, “pointy shapes” (with a lot of “inefficient”, protruding parts) can extend to the edge of that bounding box, and the two kinds of shapes will look good next to each other.

    This phenomenon can be more clearly explained with a bit of mathematics, I think. Icons of different shapes and sizes look good when placed next to each other so long as they both remain in the same bounding box and share the same total area.

    Mrgan’s “pointy shape” (the star) and his “full shape” (a box), when both set to fill the size of his bounding box, do not occupy the same about of space. It is only when he shrinks the box to occupy the same area as the star that it becomes harmonious.

    via: mrgan
  12. June
    16
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    30 minutes with Eiji Aonuma: The Zelda series director on building and shipping one of gaming's biggest franchises

    At E3 this year, I was fortunate enough to be personally invited to spend half an hour with Zelda series director Eiji Aonuma. Rather than ask Mr. Aonuma questions about future products that I knew he wouldn’t be able to answer, I wanted to focus on him and his work in a way that respects his individuality and unique approach to building a franchise that has shaped so many peoples’ lives. My hope is that, through reading this interview, you’ll feel like you were there in the room with him.

    I think you’ll really like this interview, so check it out.

  13. June
    7
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    Slick new cards arrived just in time for my trip to LA.

  14. June
    2
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    Ethereal Macro Photos of Snowflakes in the Moments Before They Disappear

    Incredible photos.

  15. May
    23
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    humansofnewyork:

Neat moment at the Webbys last night. Fresh off the $1.1 billion sale of his company, David Karp was there with his mother, Barbara. Though I’d never met her before, Barbara came over to my seat and gave me the world’s biggest hug. She kept saying: “I am so, so proud of you.”I said to David: “Your mom just made me feel like the most special guy in the world.”He said: “That’s how she’s made me feel my whole life.”

    humansofnewyork:

    Neat moment at the Webbys last night. Fresh off the $1.1 billion sale of his company, David Karp was there with his mother, Barbara. Though I’d never met her before, Barbara came over to my seat and gave me the world’s biggest hug. She kept saying: “I am so, so proud of you.”
    I said to David: “Your mom just made me feel like the most special guy in the world.”
    He said: “That’s how she’s made me feel my whole life.”

    (via codydaviestv)

    via: humansofnewyork